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Meetings  

2005 Zone 11 Meeting

By Steve Feller, Coe College SPS Advisor

 

The Zone 11 2005 Zone Meeting was opened on Friday evening, March 25th, 2005, with 25 people in attendence. The schedule for the meeting follows, along with abstracts for some of the talks.

Friday Night, March 25

  • Arrive and tour Linn County History Center 5:30-6:00 PM
  • Banquet Dinner (Chinese) 6:00 PM
  • Talk: "The Search for Amelia Earharts Plane"
    by Rod Blocksome 7:00 PM
  • Built crystal radios--prizes were give for the first two completed radios

Saturday Morning, March 26 at Coe College Physics

  • Breakfast (Hot Krispy Cream) 8:45 AM
  • "Honey I Shrank the Universe" by Ken Gayley 9:00 AM
  • Poster session 10:00-10:45 AM
  • Team Competition-egg drop from about 20 feet. 10:45 AM
  • Lunch 11:45 AM
  • Optional Lab tours after lunch

Here are the abstracts for the talks:

 

Friday Night

"The Search for Amelia Earharts Plane"
by Rod Blocksome, Avionics Engineer at Rockwell Collins, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Amelia Earhart was the pioneer woman flyer in the1920s and 1930s. She set many world records for flying including being the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean in 1928 and being the first woman to solo the Atlantic Ocean in 1932. In 1937 her attempt to be the first woman to make an around the world flight her plane failed when her plane was lost. To date it has not been found. Using ideas of radio transmissions from the plane attempts are being made to find the plane.

 

Saturday Morning

"Honey I Shrank the Universe"
by Professor Ken Gayley of the Universityof Iowa.

Special relativity confounds our common sense about absolute descriptions of space and time. These same difficulties extend to general relativity, which may be understood in different ways and from different frames of reference. This has interesting ramifications for commonly used descriptions of Big Bang redshifts of the cosmic background radiation. What language should we use to describe the large-scale state of our universe?

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